I don’t know many bloggers who earn money from their blog alone. By that, I’m referencing mainly to my previous point about thinking bigger than your blog. Most bloggers don’t earn a living just from selling sidebar ads and writing one post everyday. A Beautiful Mess sells books and e-courses. Designlovefest teaches Blogshop, a popular Photoshop workshop for bloggers. Oh Joy! just created a line of products for Target. These are some of the biggest bloggers I know of, yet they are constantly innovating and thinking of new ways to use their blog as a creative starting point and marketing tool. Be an innovator. Branch out.
This sounds a bit similar to my experience, however with a better ending. I accidentally signed up for their WordPress account only to discover I couldn’t do really anything else with the account. I wanted the full (cPanel) version. I called them up and they very graciously switched me at no charge. And, I can still do WordPress on my account.
If you’re using your existing WordPress blog to sell plugins, you’ll want to make sure that the plugin you create directly fulfills a need of your audience. You can survey them to see what problems they need to solve on their WordPress site, and then create a plugin that solves that problem.
Stay within the Visual editor if you are new to blogging and are not familiar with code. This will give you a more “visual” look at what you are drafting when it comes to header sizes, font styles, and formats.
Here’s my suggestion: Before you start a blog, make sure you have some ideas what to write about. If you don’t have any – think about your hobbies or things you’re passionate about. This helped me to find my niche/topic for my blog.
Above we mentioned the difference between CPC and CPM ads, where you are paid per click or per thousand views. While you could use one of those models for selling banner ads, most bloggers charge a flat rate instead. Charging a flat rate is easier than keeping track of views or clicks.
Personally, I use iPage (for my blog domain and hosting), and I’ve got nothing but good things to say about it. It’s probably one of the cheapest (less than $2.50 per month) hosting providers out there. A domain name will cost around $10-15 a year, but with iPage they throw that in for free :). Big smiles for that! They’re the providers I use for all of my blogs, including the one you’re reading right now.
From there, I went to work for other big blogs for a few years, helping grow Copyblogger and KISSmetrics into what they are today. Eventually though, I felt the itch to go out on my own again, so I left and started this blog. It now turns a fairly steady $100,000+ a month.
My hurdle that you make seem so easy comes for this one line: “Write content that gets lots of traffic”. I know that I write good content, but content that gets lots of traffic … well. In that one line you have made the most difficult part of getting started seem like a “no brainer”.
Hi Gemma, Having 10 visitors per day to a new site is great. The numbers will grow as you start building more pages. If you are concerned about visitors and want to attract more, check out the post I wrote on promoting your blog: https://startbloggingonline.com/how-to-promote-your-blog-and-get-visitors/
Laurel, I am so thrilled for you. That’s awesome news. You deserve it though, you’ve put in the hard yards to truly understand your audience. Your blog is beautiful, entertaining, and ‘on the money’ – literally! Well done. Inspiring stuff.
Still, I think there are some more things that could be added. For instance, I made a DIY laptop stand that reduced my usual back pain to a great extent, I use pen and paper when jotting ideas … instead of digital tools.
Notoriety. Don’t plan on getting “Internet famous” right away. Not every site grows as fast as ours did, but that’s totally OK. The truth is that we kind of got lucky. We got a great domain name, we cobbled together a logo and site design that people really liked, we write fairly well, and our content connects with people in a unique way. We didn’t start this site to become “famous” though. That’d be ridiculous. Our notoriety and quick rise to “fame” came as a surprise to us, and was a result of a little luck and a lot of hard, passionate work.
Your article about “How Much Money Can You Make From a Travel Blog?” is very informative for people who do not have jobs after must read your article they must create free blogs and work on it and follow your earning rules.
Cross promote on other YouTube channels and relevant websites. Reach out and get in touch with some of your favorite bloggers and vloggers. Try and collaborate with them by cross marketing each others content. You could add them to your “Featured channels” list and they will become one of the “suggested channels” to your subscribers.
One of the biggest misconceptions that I see bloggers having about monetising blogs is that they have to do it in one of a handful of ways. The reality is that there are many ways to make money from blogs.
Direct Income – when I started making money from my blogs it was through ‘direct’ income streams. I put AdSense ads on my blog and promoted some products on Amazon as an affiliate and the more readers I had the more income began to trickle in (it really was a trickle at first). In time as my traffic grew this income grew and I was also able to experiment with other direct forms of income such as selling advertising directly to advertisers.
Really important guide! Starting a blog has many aspects that are hard to figure out. After setting up a website the difficulties are not over! Wiredelta created a dictionary to prepare beginners for the obstacles they will have to face and help them make the most out of their website. By knowing these terms you definitely have a head start.

One example is this: since our blog is a sub-domain for my wife and I’s boutique beach resort, nobody seems to want to touch me as a guest blogger. I get the same response every time “you’re commercial and so you’ve got to pay for a sponsored post”…and while yes, we are commercial and not a private blog per se, we’re a tiny family run business and 95% of private blogs are striving to be commercial, whether they’re associated with a company name or not.
I suppose I just don’t see why being DEVOID of a blog and social media will make you an attractive guest blogging candidate. I get that you’ll maybe be more focused on finding guest blogs rather than building up your Twitter following, but couldn’t you just ask easily say that we should focus on doing nothing but building followers on Twitter, because you can then build relationships and find guest posting opportunities through the people you meet in social media?
I am going to New Zealand and Australia for two months in a couple of weeks and want to make a travel blog for friends and family in uk and other places. It will have photos, videos (a lot!) and text. It won’t be commercial, I’m not selling anything and will only do it whilst I am away and maybe for a little while when I return.
I think doing a post on paid ad spend would be killer, I know a lot of blog owners out there like myself who have the budget and have experimented some but just not seeing great results. I’ve used SU paid discovery, and while relatively cheap, I find that most of the traffic doesn’t convert into subscribers or return visitors.
I agree with all of your points. I especially need to focus on visual art sides of my blogging. I use images here and there but I need to integrate them better into the blog. I also need to start taking them myself as I have a several thousand dollar Nikon SLR sitting around not being used. Thanks for writing this for us.
With dropshipping, you create the store, manage the website, and customer service. But a dropshipping service will take your orders and ship them out to your customers. They’re an invisible third party that your customers don’t even know about.