I’m sure a lot of people will argue that it is that 5% that makes the difference but I’m not so sure anymore. Be prepared to see a lot more stuff from me this year and expect it to be only half-polished.
If you’re not making any money from your blog, it’s hard to stay motivated to continue. The opposite is also true. For instance, how do you think I feel when I see this number pop up on my dashboard every day?
This goes against the grain of 90% of what I’ve learned from the”experts” in the last 9 months of blogging. But man it feels right. I’m so worried about short term gains that I’m not building a long term foundation. I’m thinking so small! These lessons are profound, Jon. Thanks!
Some free services limit monetization (i.e. making money) unless you “upgrade” to a higher level. You’ll have to pay for that upgrade of course, so it defeats the purpose of having a free blog in the first place.
Some time a few years ago I was fed up writing for no one online. I wanted my words to be read and ultimately wanted to be paid to write. So I decided to educate myself on the subject. Here’s what I did:
For example I really launched a blog in the survivalist niche a couple of years ago which I sold for a great profit. The reason I created this blog was that I enjoy being outdoors, hiking and mountain biking etc. I also watch a lot of TV shows about people like Bear Grylls and Ray Mears.
One of our favorite things about Bluehost is their WordPress hosting built on revolutionary VPS technology. Since they use the power of virtual servers instead of shared servers, WordPress websites run insanely fast.
Really excellent article. One suggestion or caution with Godaddy though…Godaddy has a product called WordPress Hosting. I signed up for it, and all was fine until I installed a plugin which had a special requirement that needed to be set up by the webhost. (something in the server side settings). I called Godaddy and they advised they can’t make those changes. Only on their individual hosting plans would that have been possible. This is a rare event, but worth keeping in mind. When you go for your own hosting you have more flexibility.
PS: my answer to this question is always… “the better question is… how can my blog help me build a profitable business?” Most of the profits from blogging are not made on your blog, but that’s okay. I don’t believe blogging about making money per se, but about branding yourself and positioning yourself within your niche market as an authority and leader. Once that is established, there are so many ways to move people into your money making enterprises. Email marketing, as you pointed out, is one of the best ways to do this. Sending people to your membership sites, services, info products and coaching programs are all great things to route people into as well.
Great post, blogging is hard and consistency is required. We run a Nature and travel blog and I think the most important thing we tell people is to start blogging with a purpose, Do not just start and end up soon. Niche is key and many miss out on that because they want to cover and do it all. Do not just start a blog because you think you will get rich quick and be able to travel the world. It takes a lot of work and lots of time.
When you click that blue button you’ll be taken to our guide to starting a blog. Once you buy your domain name, we’ll hook you up with our $20 Pro Blogging ebook totally free! This book will help you to start earning money from travel blogging and turn your travel blogging hobby into a career.
If all this affiliate marketing stuff sound like rocket science to you then I’d suggest you take advantage of some training on how to set up your own passive income generating online affiliate business.
Hi Gemma, Having 10 visitors per day to a new site is great. The numbers will grow as you start building more pages. If you are concerned about visitors and want to attract more, check out the post I wrote on promoting your blog: https://startbloggingonline.com/how-to-promote-your-blog-and-get-visitors/
Theme. A good theme gives you the look and feel you want for your blog, allowing you to make a blog that looks exactly how you want it to look. If you’re not a coder (we certainly weren’t), then a theme makes the design work a million times easier. Plus, once you purchase a theme, which are inexpensive for the time they save you, you own it for life. A theme has two halves: the framework (the bones) and the Child Theme (the beauty):
Because it doesn’t cost you anything, WordPress.com is a good option if you want to start a blog as a school project, to stay in touch with friends and family, or simply to see if you like this whole blogging thing at all before investing in something more substantial.
This is awesome post. More energy for new bloggers and monetization methods. The ultimate way to earn from blogging is to have something your own to sell. starting from cheaper and at discounted price is also good to penetrate in this market.
Unfortunately I can’t find any way to hide it. The good news is that your FB friends won’t see that in any way when they look at your profile (unless you “like” your own page), but I realize it could still be a problem if someone is sitting next to you while you’re logged in. Facebook really hasn’t done a good job of working with people who want to separate business (or blog) and personal. When I blogged semi-anonymously, I was terrified of accidentally posting something to the wrong account! And it happened quite a few times. Sorry I can’t be more help!
Personally, I use iPage (for my blog domain and hosting), and I’ve got nothing but good things to say about it. It’s probably one of the cheapest (less than $2.50 per month) hosting providers out there. A domain name will cost around $10-15 a year, but with iPage they throw that in for free :). Big smiles for that! They’re the providers I use for all of my blogs, including the one you’re reading right now.
Congratulations! A very interesting post. I am agree with almost everything you say. Only could add, that more beauty shall be required in internet. Most of the blogs are without design, and maybe it could be the Play for artists. Thanks
If the name you want isn’t available, HostGator will show you some alternatives that are similar – or you can punch in a new name and try again. I’d suggest you use something that ends with .com, .net or .org
I echo the sentiments posted before me… this was extremely helpful in the quest to begin my own blog for profit. It is well written, informative, and full of links to more material. Thank you for sharing your wealth of knowledge with all of us! Hopefully I can build a brand that is this helpful to others!
I LOVE this post and have shared it as far and wide as I can. I must admit, having recently started writing for the HuffPost, I’ve felt guilty for hardly posting anything on my own blog (just don’t have the time to do both) so your post has made me feel much better for prioritising the guest posting.

If you want to blog anonymously or don’t want people to contact you, you can leave this out, but otherwise you’ll want to include some information about how people can contact you — especially if you’re hoping to make money blogging.
So this is really based on when you’re planning to blog about ‘making money online’ I guess… because lesson #10 “Don’t Waste Time on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, etc.” is so not true when you’re blogging about travel, recipes, photography, viral topics, news….. and a whole lot more.:P
Changing your theme is the simplest way to customize your blog, but there are lots of of other customizations you can do. Check out my full post on customizing your blog for an in-depth step-by-step guide. You can also watch the video at the end of this guide to see me completely customize a blog from scratch.
Hey Ramsay, an excellent post! While I’ve created numerous WordPress websites, none of them have really stood the test of time. Mainly because I haven’t been passionate about any of them. My goal was to make money with them, and that’s not good enough!
Pat Flynn, for example, makes over $100,000 a month in affiliate commissions. Here at Smart Blogger, we mostly promote our own products, but we also make a tidy sum promoting LeadPages and SiteGround:
Know what you want. When you’re interviewing somebody for your site, always enter the interview knowing what story you want them to tell. Have a Skype chat or email exchange with them, before they’re in front of a camera. Do your due diligence: ask what they’re working on, and what interesting opinions they have, and agree in advance what you’ll ask them. During the interview is NOT when you should be deciding what questions to ask.
Seriously can’t believe I’m trying to do this after midnight. I must be crazy. Well it’s up for what it’s worth. Gonna go ahead and invite my RL friends from my FB page tomorrow. Somebody send me a shamrock for luck.
This is a really interesting post Jon. What you’ve listed here are the “tools of the trade” so to speak. Every type of business has a list of things specific to that business that must happen in order for their to be income produced. If that list isn’t followed, then you have a hobby, not a business.