If you don’t like any of the themes that are already installed you can easily choose from thousands of other free themes. To install a new theme, click on the “Appearance” tab on the left menu and then click “Add New”.
Readers don’t love being hit with ads over and over again, so start by including just one or two in your sidebar. Be sure to monitor the ads that show up on your blog — you don’t want scammy “make $35,000 in 20 minutes from home!” ads to distract readers from your great content.
Recognition for yourself or your business. No, you probably won’t have paparazzi following you around because of your latest blog post. But a successful blog can gain you a ton of recognition in your respective field. Many bloggers are known as experts just because of their blogs, and some have even gotten book and movie deals based on their blogs.
Great article. I agree with you mainly on the ideas that SEO is changing but not really. I love the analogy with the car as well. Also the fact that you have a personal goal at the end of the list I hope will encourage all your readers to choose one for their own as well.
Create a digital business that can be promoted through your blog. For example, many of my graphic design clients are people who have found me through my blog. Other ideas are to create an Etsy shop or be a social media guru.
So how much is hosting and a domain name? Not as much as you’re thinking, fortunately. It usually works out to about $5 to $10 per month, depending on your hosting provider which is less than a couple of coffees.
Having said that, if you’re targeting a supersaturated audience, one way to “niche” yourself is with a unique style of writing. You can probably think of lots of examples where humor, style, or oddness make a particular blog memorable.
The great thing is that it does take a while to start building traffic. This can sound bad, but the truth is that during this slow time, it gives you time to learn how to improve your SEO, get comfortable blogging and start learning as much as you can.
Are they sending out regular emails to their readers? Do they offer merchandise? Do they have ads? Is there a pop-up newsletter box every time you click? Do they update frequently? How do they interact with commenters? What are they doing on social media?
Wonderful post. there were so many ideas that I got from you and now I can’t wait to update my comment blog posts. Very well done and thank you so much for sharing such n important post. I also appreciated all the comments you generated from some very experienced bloggers.
I would look at trying to build more strategic relationships with other bloggers in your nice. Aiming for mentions and more writing opportunities will probably be effective, but also look at paid advertising.
It’s secure; WordPress is always updating their software and keeping everything sound and secure, so there’s rarely a worry of having your blog come under hacking attacks. No wonder Facebook, NASA, and even university blogs are using WordPress.
I think the most important question you should ask is – before doing anything else – who are these people signing up for my mailing list? What have they’ve accomplished so far and where they’re looking to go? If they’re giving you money by signing up for one of your courses, that goes double.
You suggest not posting on your blog until you have a decent amount of subscribers, you also mention how surveys are dangerous for finding what your audience needs – My question is: How do you decide what your audience needs a service for if you’ve yet to build an audience?
For the most part you shouldn’t worry about “finding a voice,” like some fiction writers are taught. Just write the same way you talk. Blogging is a lot less formal than other printed media and since it’s an interactive platform, it’s easiest to just be yourself.
Jon, amazing article! I would just add to your #15 regarding e-mail subscribers. The number you described is real if you have a legit database of subscribers behind it (don’t know if you take this here for granted).
And so, I guess my question here would simply be–would a person who follows your blog about TV shows be interested in paying for a TV-related webinar you created? Would a person who follows your blog about vinyl record collecting want to buy an online course from you? Would a person who follows a travel blog you created want to call you up for coaching lessons?
Bluehost makes it effortless to install WordPress from the control panel in your hosting account. They also include a content delivery network (CDN) to provide faster website loading for people located geographically farther from their servers. And, all websites get a free SSL certificate to reassure your site visitors that their information is secure.
Hi Jess, I already own a free hosted blog on wordpress because as a student I don’t really have enough money to get self hosting due to the yearly payment. right now I can’t activate Adsense and it’s being restrictive. please do you think ipage is cheaper and is it monthly payment.
As with many of the items on this list, this works best if you specialize in a niche. If you offer everything, it’s impossible to compete with a big shop like Amazon. But in a small niche, you can differentiate yourself and really stand out.
most bloggers make $0..01 per page view or $0.02 per visitor. Very succssful (efficient) bloggers make 10 times more than that (I’ve made a research about it – researchasahobby.com/how-much-money-can-earn-blogging-per-visitor/)..
Andrea Whitmer is a full-time freelance web developer who works exclusively with the Genesis framework. She enjoys helping web designers work smarter, not harder, and dedicates her time to training, tech support, and dev work. Connect with Andrea on Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, or Instagram.
Within a month, I had On Moneymaking off the ground, and within two months, it was getting 2,000 visitors a day and Performancing nominated it for the best business/money blog of the year. A couple of months after that, Brian Clark asked me to become the Associate Editor of Copyblogger, and so I sold On Moneymaking for five figures and went to work at one of the most popular blogs at the world.
I have closed my first blog (frankly I’m failed in blogging) and started new blog two years back, its going fine now but my income depends on ads, I just want to skip from this and planning to implement affiliate and building my own product. This post gives a clear idea about I’m travelling on right path.
Awesome article! Greatly appreciate the wealth of knowledge I’ve found here on Blog Tyrant! I’ve been researching for a year now and am excited to move forward now using so much of the great instruction I’ve found here.
I think now that I have finally started to have a better understanding of how to provide value. My new challenge is learning how to differentiate when I’m giving “too much” value, in the case where I should have just packaged up the content and created a product.
Then, pitch high-traffic sites and try to get on as a regular, paid blogger. From there, if you’re writing well, other clients who need help from a professional blogger will begin to find you. If you can understand what they need to say and the audience they are trying to reach, you can grow your stable of blogging clients.
It all depends where the most people are that will be interested in your site / niche / product. I target ads in countries such as UK, USA, Canada and India, only because there are vast numbers of English speakers there with enough disposable income to want to buy through my sites.
When I was at Copyblogger, we ran a little experiment. Normally, we refused to sell any ads on the site, but just as a test, we decided to put three ad spots in the right sidebar. The site looked like this:
As for the recent changes, I probably need to write a post. Personally, I’m backing away from Facebook and focusing my energy more on Twitter and Google+. For awhile you could get more views of your posts by posting a status, then putting the link in the first comment, but I just read an article that said FB is going to start cutting back on exposure for those as well. Basically, it seems that unless you’re willing to pay for ads, there is no guarantee that your fans will see your posts (even if they want to). I think it’s really disgusting on FB’s part and I’m willing to walk away at this point. I’ll keep auto posting new blog posts there, but otherwise I’ll engage with my audience and clients on networks that let people make their own decisions about what they see and what they don’t. (Whew, got a little ranty there!)
Flippa is already killing it. But this year I think they will kill it even more (not sure what that means) because more and more people are going to be buying blogs to skip the initial stages of a blog’s life.
Note: Even though a self-hosted WordPress blog is sometimes referred to as a “WordPress.org” blog, you are not limited to a .org at the end of your name. You can still use .com, just like I do for AmyLynnAndrews.com.

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