Video blogging (aka vlogging) is pretty much like Internet TV.  Bloggers can film themselves on video, upload the clip to a host site like YouTube, and then embed a link (or HTML code) on their blog to share with the world.
Great article about blogging. This is very helpful. I have been blogging about fashion for my Apparel Search website for many years, but have not received much traction for the efforts. Hopefully your suggestions will be of help. Even though I post often and I think with helpful information for people interesting in clothing, I don’t seem to gain any followers. After several years, I have people reading the blogs, but no followers and not many people posting comments. Rather frustrating, but I will continue my efforts. Anyway, thank you for your post and hopefully it helps me and others improve our blogging.
Great post ! Thanks. Personally I see a tendency that is becoming more and more important. Small and medium size bloggers getting to work together on a range of projects. Contests, swap of content, NGO’s and charity actions…
Amazing article. I’d like to stress so much on funnel building. You can collect all the emails in the world, however if you do not have a tested system, all those emails will go to waste. Value is so much more important than just selling. If your audience feels they are getting something in return, be sure they will take that next step to buy a product or service from you because they know you and trust your advice…
In regards to the fractions of seconds; it actually makes a huge difference. Studies by Amazon, Yahoo and a bunch of others have showed that increments of as small as 0.2 of a second can decrease sales by up to 7%.
Did you do your 301 redirects so that googs knows it’s really the same domain, just with a different name? I also changed domains—twice. yuck. Nobody was reading me back then, but it’s not fun while you’re going through just the same.
It can take years to learn how to wrangle Google search algorithms to your benefit (and once you master the techniques, they change the rules on you), but learn a few basic tricks to help new readers find you.
I agree about foregoing ads and instead selling your own products in those ad spaces. This might however not be applicable to bloggers who are still new and running the ropes, and to blogs that are still in their growth phase.
Add Value. Your blog must add value to its readers’ lives. This is the only way you will get Great Quality Readers to your site (and keep them coming back). Adding value is the only way to get someone’s long-term buy-in. We both learned this after a decade of leading and managing people in the corporate world.
When I started my blog a little over a year ago, I didn’t really know that it was possible to earn any kind of dough from running a website. I’d heard of bloggers, of course, but they might as well have been mythical creatures of the new millennium. I didn’t know any steadfast bloggers, and certainly none that were making cash from their hobby. But as I began to dip my toes deep into Blogland, I realized that the possibilities were nearly limitless. With hard work and some research, I knew that blogging was a gateway and tool to reach many other things. One of those things simply being, income. Since I was absolutely clueless about all of this when I first started, I thought it might be helpful for you all if I shared some of the ways I’ve found for how to earn money as a blogger.
A common way that many bloggers make money is through offering services to their readers. These might be anything from coaching and consulting, to writing or copywriting, to design, training or other freelance services.
First, start a blog if you haven’t already. Next, focus on building up a solid library of at least 10-20 blog posts. Make sure they are helpful and meaty. Figure out which income streams are natural extensions of your posts. In the meantime, build relationships on social media, in Facebook Groups and wherever your potential readers hang out. Don’t just promote your own stuff, but be a helpful part of the conversation. People will eventually check out what you have to offer.
I mean, of course I’d come up with suitable content for Forbes should they wish to publish me, haha, but honestly we’d be happy with guest posting on even mildly popular travel blogs. The problem up to now, as I mentioned above, is that nobody wants to let us guest post, they want us to pay to do a sponsored post since our blog is attached to our business. If my blog was MexicoMike.com instead of http://blog.geckorockresort.com/ then it wouldn’t be an issue, but as soon as anyone sees the name of our business they incorrectly assume we’re loaded 🙂
Thank you so much for this post! I am one of those people who decided to blog full time for a living and am loving every thing about it regardless of the lack of time, social life or sleep. I truly believe that we have an opportunity to do what we love for a living. I will definitely start guest posting more often (I’ve only done a few).
Personally, I use iPage (for my blog domain and hosting), and I’ve got nothing but good things to say about it. It’s probably one of the cheapest (less than $2.50 per month) hosting providers out there. A domain name will cost around $10-15 a year, but with iPage they throw that in for free :). Big smiles for that! They’re the providers I use for all of my blogs, including the one you’re reading right now.
John..Love your writing and your story about you and your mom’s insatiable perseverance. I have been reading your site a lot lately (you probably already know that) and love the wisdom you are passing on. I am constantly seeking new ideas and insights and glad I found the site. Keep up the good work and your entertaining writing style!
Remember that your viewers are watching because they already like your blog.  Keeping this in mind will help you to create an engaging vlog and avoid becoming a robot behind the camera.  Relax, smile and talk about what you know.
Hello Jon, Wow now this article is right on cue, All 20 lesson’s Rock! I got so much out of this one, oh yeh 2 pages of notes HEHE Yes I do take notes, I can ‘t remember all of these goodies after I leave. I think it is a great idea, why not they just may come in handy right.
Bloggers often write from a personal perspective that allows them to connect directly with their readers. In addition, most blogs also have a “comments” section where readers can correspond with the blogger. Interacting with your readers in the comments section helps to further the connection between the blogger and the reader.
Reminder: TheMinimalists.com is a Bluehost affiliate partner, which means that in addition to using their service, we also receive a referral credit for referring new customers. To be fair, though, we would still use Bluehost even if we weren’t an affiliate. Ergo, we don’t recommend Bluehost just because we’re an affiliate (every hosting company offers a similar affiliate program); we recommend Bluehost because they are the best, most reliable option. Plus, because we’re a partner, Bluehost offers a special price for The Minimalists‘ readers: only $2.95 a month. That’s a phenomenal price.
One of the most frustrating things for me since I began blogging was getting more engagement on my blog posts. When I first started I went from nothing to around 200,000 on Alexa in about 3 to 6 months. After that, I had a long hiatus of no content and flew back up past 10,000,000.
You brought up some really good points in your posting. I’ve been a blogger for @ 12 hours now and I’m thankful to get glimpse of the full scope of the blogging world. Your posts informed me on the importance of “guest posting”. I have not even heard of that. Thank you and I’ll be out on other blogs posting.
What you’ll blog about depends on your goals. Do you want to share your adventures with your friends back home while you travel around the world for a year? Are you hoping to spread the word about your freelance business? Do you want to share your expertise on a particular topic? Or are you hoping to turn your blog into a business?
I don’t know many bloggers who earn money from their blog alone. By that, I’m referencing mainly to my previous point about thinking bigger than your blog. Most bloggers don’t earn a living just from selling sidebar ads and writing one post everyday. A Beautiful Mess sells books and e-courses. Designlovefest teaches Blogshop, a popular Photoshop workshop for bloggers. Oh Joy! just created a line of products for Target. These are some of the biggest bloggers I know of, yet they are constantly innovating and thinking of new ways to use their blog as a creative starting point and marketing tool. Be an innovator. Branch out.
If you use the method below, $5 to $10 a month. I blogged for years on this budget. As my blog and income grew, I eventually started paying for more premium tools and services, but they are not required to start.
hey i actaully have 2 questions about starting a blog..1. is that if i just have a free blog on WordPress, and my blog is owned by them, will i still get money for it?? 2. i already made a free WordPress blog, but in case of any mind changes can i switch to a hosting company (iPage) while still keeping the page i have already made? or would i have to start all over again?
Premium domains usually start at $1,000+, but some change hands for $100,000s or even millions of dollars. Before you fall in love with your dream domain name (and have to remortgage the house), you have been warned!
There are plenty of places to find professional web design help. You can take advantage of gig powerhouses like Fiverr, Upwork, or 99designs. You could also do a local Google search to find design firms close to you.
Great information all in one place. I am new to blogging and having a blast. Deciding on a niche was a bitch. I am interested in so many things that I had to follow all of them until I found my groove. It’s a big problem not settling in one niche. At the moment I am in two niches and celebrating the focus.
I think I can confidently say that 100% of the blogs I read are because of their content and not their backer, and I don’t think I’ve ever clicked ‘back’ because of what was by the copyright. Many do annoy me, however.
I’m impressed about the depth of insight you seem to command in this area. It is true there are lots of sites that means opposite of what they say or write but yours is different. Keep on doing a good job out there.
And so, I guess my question here would simply be–would a person who follows your blog about TV shows be interested in paying for a TV-related webinar you created? Would a person who follows your blog about vinyl record collecting want to buy an online course from you? Would a person who follows a travel blog you created want to call you up for coaching lessons?
I think it was perhaps this article from Sydney about a study of 220,000 Australian residents who sat still for long periods. There have been a few follow up studies since that freaked me out, especially because it says exercise doesn’t undo all the bad blogging vibes!
Jon, it’s so disheartening to read this list. Not for my sake, but for the sake of all the hobby bloggers I know who keep asking me why their blogs aren’t getting the traffic, attention, or sales they were hoping for, and how in the world can I be building my email list before I even start blogging? Am I STUPID or something?!
Great article, Ramsay. I have a question about adding visual content. You say that it’s a good idea to belong to a stock photo site that has an attribution license. It seems like that’s how all of the stock photo sites are nowadays.
Need another reason to add photos? Readers love to put a face to the name, or an image to the recipe or colors to the outfit — and when you add something visual, they’re a lot more likely to share your post with their friends or followers, which goes a long way toward helping your blog gain traction.
On top of that, it should be easy to navigate if you want people to stick around. If it’s tricky and difficult to move around it, people won’t stay. Design is a subjective art; meaning everyone likes different things.

Rather than publishing banner ads on your website via Adsense or another 3rd party you can always work with advertisers to setup their banner ads directly. Generally banner ads are paid on a CPM model, which is basically a price per 1000 impressions of their banner on your website.
There are hundreds of different web hosting providers. They all offer you a similar service (domain + hosting) with a similar price, but since I’ve dealt with and monitored many famous and recommended web hosting companies like Bluehost, iPage, Godaddy etc…