A common way that many bloggers make money is through offering services to their readers. These might be anything from coaching and consulting, to writing or copywriting, to design, training or other freelance services.
For me this  affordable course from Michelle Schroeder-Gardner is the only thing your will need to truly understand the art of making money through blogging. It will show you how you can get up and running extremely quickly and with no affiliate marketing experience needed.
As I write this, it just so happens that I’m in the initial stages of starting a new blog (more details to be announced soon). It’s in a completely different space where I have no products, so I’ve been pondering the best way to monetize it, and here’s what I think…
Thank you Sir for giving valuable information. I have been following you for a while and learned a lot. Really love your SEO articles about getting better google ranking. I am a wedding photographer and trying to promote my website online as best as I can? Thank you again!
That’s easier said than done, but here are some easy tricks to get your ideas flowing. Write down whatever comes to mind as a potential post, and then go through your list anytime you need inspiration.
Money. You should not start a blog to make money. We need to get that out of the way first. If your primary objective is to replace your full-time income from blogging, forget about it. It doesn’t work that way. Do you think that Jimi Hendrix picked up his first guitar so he could “supplement his income”? No, he didn’t. Rather, he did it for the love of it, for the joy and fulfillment he received, and the income came thereafter, much later actually.
Thank you for your advice. I’m definitely interested in applying these techniques to my make money online blog. I currently have Google Adsense on my blog and I offer advertising banner spots on my website through micro job sites. But $100k a month is awesome! I’ll even be happy with $100k a year. If I can get my blog on that level, I could quit my job and work from home. I’m re-reading these techniques tonight and applying them to my blog. Thank you so much!
On the posts screen, you will notice several other sections such as Categories and Tags. You can use these to organize your blog posts. We have a great writeup on the difference between categories vs tags, which we highly recommend that you read.
To get started, it’s a good idea to put together a one-page media kit that details your traffic stats, social media following, audience demographics, and any other data that will make your site more appealing to advertisers. Then, you can approach companies to negotiate a sponsorship deal.
Ive been so busy working in illustration through my site that most of the time there´s no room to work on anything else but after reading your text i think i need to find some extra time asp to go back to blogging….thanks.
In addition to getting new readers to your blog, you will also want to make sure your current readers are coming back. This is where email marketing plays a big role. By collecting the email addresses of your visitors (with their permission of course), you can then notify them when you post something new on your blog. This keeps people coming back to your blog, which not only gives you more readers over time, it also allows you to build a closer relationship with your readers.
Hi! I honestly love to start a blog because almost everyone in my school already doing it and Im feeling out of place but Im thinking if its too late to start up cause I dont want to stress up myself anymore
Great information Ramsay! This is just what I was looking for. I wanted to start blogging as a way to create supplemental income in the future, as well as provide personal finance advice to young people like me. These are things like how I’ve made money in the stock and housing market in my 20’s.
Ramsay, top post, I really like updating old posts and bringing them back to life. It just shows the importance of caring for your blog visitors and giving them accurate picture every time they visit. just shared it on FB, Tw.,FB and LI.
The top partner has the first shot to fill an ad – if they don’t – they “pass back” that ad request to Adsense (since Adsense is a 100% fill solution but tends to have lower CPMs than other ad networks).
I really want to start my own blog and earn money from it. And everyone I know just recommended me to use WordPress. I know WordPress is a good one, but I heard Google Adsense wont work with it. Is it true? And if it’s true, is there any platform that as good as WordPress that’ll work with Google Adsense? Thank you.
While the other blogging platforms are generally all pretty OK, nothing, in my opinion, has ever come close to matching the freedom and customization options that WordPress offers. So without a doubt, go with WordPress. Especially when you are just starting out.
That’s just amazing. I never thought there can be a number of options to earn from blogs. I always thought serving ads is the only way. Thanks a lot for changing my mind set. Keep sharing informative articles.
One of our favorite things about Bluehost is their WordPress hosting built on revolutionary VPS technology. Since they use the power of virtual servers instead of shared servers, WordPress websites run insanely fast.
What is CPC? CPC stands for “cost per click.” By displaying CPC ads with Google Adsense, you receive a set fee every time an ad on your website is clicked by a visitor. The cost per click is set by the advertiser. (This is in contrast to CPM ads, where you’re paid for ad views instead of clicks. CPM means “cost per thousand impressions,” where M is the roman numeral for 1,000.)
It all depends where the most people are that will be interested in your site / niche / product. I target ads in countries such as UK, USA, Canada and India, only because there are vast numbers of English speakers there with enough disposable income to want to buy through my sites.

The other major difference is Squarespace isn’t free. It has a number of different packages, but you should expect to spend just under $100 per year for their cheapest plan, which is probably all you need if you’re just getting started.
I’ve been searching online to find out how can I turn my business fan page into my main feed page so my main page is not getting all the post that I post for my business page I don’t want to irritate.
My understanding is that you have to subscribe/pay for the business version of Word Press in order to use any of the monetizing functions. I think you should clearly state this in this article at the beginning. I think there is a degree of bait and switch here if people are just signing up for the free subscription and then finding out they have to pay for a subscription to make money. I am ok with that, it just needs to be stated up front everywhere.
Keyword Research. Take the time to find out what keywords relate to your content so that when people search them, your website appears as one of the most relevant results. Add keywords to the title of your blog post, in the content body, and in metadata such as image alt text.
There are plenty of places to find professional web design help. You can take advantage of gig powerhouses like Fiverr, Upwork, or 99designs. You could also do a local Google search to find design firms close to you.
Thanks for choosing to leave a comment. Please keep in mind that all comments are moderated according to our comment policy, and your email address will NOT be published. Please Do NOT use keywords in the name field. Let’s have a personal and meaningful conversation.
No, copy pasting will help you in no way. Avoid copy pasting at all costs because it seems like it is your content when all you do is copy paste, and if you want to refer to some other blog post, copy paste the content and give them proper credit by adding their blog post link in the end. 🙂 Good luck!
For example, in the United States, a blogger who publishes a sponsored post must comply with the FTC’s Endorsement Guides. This includes disclosing whenever a post is sponsored. You can do that by adding a sponsored post prefix to your post title in WordPress.
This is not a bad strategy if you want to get straight in to things and you have a few thousand to spare. There is, however, a LOT to consider before you buy a blog so please do not rush into it. If you’d like to learn more about this idea please leave a comment and I’ll consider doing an article on it.
Some time a few years ago I was fed up writing for no one online. I wanted my words to be read and ultimately wanted to be paid to write. So I decided to educate myself on the subject. Here’s what I did:
So to show you my appreciation, I had my first post thanking you for all the help in setting up my blog under my chosen domain name. It was very easy and even a 6 year old could even build a website out of this guide.
On the positive side, a quick search might show you where your competition is getting its links from and that can mean you can replicate them yourself or come up with your own similar promotional strategies. Clever!
I recommend a host I have personally paid for and used for over a decade. (As a longtime paying customer, the links below are my referral links. This means, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you make a purchase.)
7. Add your page to your Favorites. This option will place a link to your fan page in the left sidebar when you’re signed into Facebook. It’s totally optional but makes it really easy to find your page later!
I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around this one. I was blown away that you don’t have ads on your site. I have ads on my site and I’m reading along thinking your advice is to forget the ads and sell products. As a food blogger, my mind goes to e-cookbooks, actual hold-in-your-hand cookbooks, books on how to start a food blog and how to do food photography. But according to this post, those I should sell later…the cheaper products. I can’t think of what “services” I could offer, other than offering to come over and cook for them (not happening) and I’m not quite an expert at offering services of personally coaching someone’s food blog. Maybe I’m just too green for that 🙂 Am I missing the point?
I agree with your statement “Often times, you can make more money selling to the 2% than you can to the entire 98% combined.” and your following example about selling a $10,000 mentoring program for aspiring writers.
Great post guys! I’ve been travel blogging for years, but on a hosted travel blog site. Last June I set up my own blog, but then life happened, I posted infrequently and I didn’t run with it. Now this year, I’ve been actually putting effort into my travel blog since May and I have started getting emails from media companies for sponsored content. I am also doing some freelance travel writing that is proving pretty lucrative. I have another 9 months working in Jamaica, so I’m seeing how far I can get by that time and if I’m able to take the plunge!
Companies don’t offer free blogs out of the goodness of their hearts. They still want to make money somehow. If you’re only using their free service, they’re not making money from you. Therefore, they don’t have a lot of incentive to keep you happy. Sometimes this means you’ll have little to no support. Other times it means you’ll be badgered with offers for their paid-for products.
Jaime, this is an excellent article. I’ve been blogging for fun for over four years, In the last year I’ve branched out and started a self-hosted blog about blogging for fun. I’m at the point think I have enough to offer on that subject and a few others. There are so many steps to get started, I think it overwhelms people, including those of us who are comfortable blogging. There are lots of courses available, but most of them that I’ve tried are pretty general. Do you recommend getting a coach?
I have a blog that uses a wordpress theme, and blue host hosts my domain name. However, I don’t really understand what a platform is and I don’t know what my platform is. I am planning to start a new food blog with a different focus and use wordpress.org (whatever that actually means.) Does wordpress.org help you with setting up and explaining whether or not they are your platform? I am a granny (79 to be exact.) I have a three year old cooking blog that never gets visitors except for family and friends. I would like to do better with my blog, but I don’t even understand the idea of platform. Can you give me some advice as to how to proceed?
Once you’ve created a blogging website with WordPress (more on this later), it’s simple to update it with new content. You can write blog posts directly into the text field in your WordPress dashboard, or you can write them in your favorite word processor and just paste your content into WordPress. You’ll be able to format your posts and add images, as well as various other interesting features.
Gawd, I’m tired just looking at that blog total! No idea how I do it. This figure, of course, doesn’t count the posts about writing I create for this blog…so you can add another 8-10 posts a month there. To sum up, I’m a blogging fool these days!
Take the Tumblr “Follow” button that slides out of the right hand corner as you scroll down the page. That feature is very hard to ignore and has played a big part in Tumblr being so “viral” among users of that platform. It has since been copied by a lot of non-Tumblr bloggers who have found it converts quite well.
Facebook, little bit of Pinterest. I have done a couple of guest post (I think 5 or 6 so far). Bookmarked it with Stumbleupon and Filipboard. That’s more or less all, since I don’t want to have too many social accounts that I have to update. I need time to write content. What should I focus on?
As with many of the items on this list, this works best if you specialize in a niche. If you offer everything, it’s impossible to compete with a big shop like Amazon. But in a small niche, you can differentiate yourself and really stand out.
In other words, Jon is an incredible writer, communicator, and hard worker–no question. But you’re in the business of helping other people make money. You’re not, by contrast, a travel blogger. You’re not, by contrast, helping to teach people how to buy their first pet. You’re not, by contrast, an entertainment blogger writing about Rihanna and “True Detective.”