You see, when you first start a blog you have to do a lot of groundwork that takes time. Research, pillar articles, networking, logo creation, social media accounts set up, etc. It is a very time consuming process.
Start selling from day one…I’ve always thought you had to build a sizable audience and then drop that knowledge that they’ll pay for. But doing it for the motivation to make money FORCES you to create a damn good product(s). Makes complete sense, Jon. Thanks!!!
Sunday funday. Taking it easy before I hit the lightroom harder than ever. The work never ends. Loving the newest blog post. If you haven’t seen it then you should :o) More abandoned pictures very soon. Thanks everyone for all the support.
I started my first ever blog by writing on a consistent schedule about myself, my hobbies and interests. People found me via Google, Facebook, social media and my readership gradually grew over time to where it is today.
If, however, you do experience extensive downtime with Bluehost, they’ll let you pull out of your contract early. If you do this, they’ll issue a pro-rated refund for the remainder of your subscription.
I had never considered the value of giving webinars. I had attended plenty of webinars and purchased some products based on same. It hadn’t occurred to me the economic value of giving webinars prior to reading your post.
I’m starting from square one in terms of becoming a blogger. I don’t even know what I want to blog about yet. My goals for starting a blog are a bit different than many, however. I’m not trying to create another source of income; I would simply be trying to create a reader base because my ultimate goal is to become a published novelist and when pitching your book, I believe it is helpful to already have an established readership. This will theoretically help you stand out to agents/publishers. 🙂 In addition, blogging would help me develop my writing skills, hopefully be of some use to people, and allow me to express myself and connect with others. Do you have any advice for me?
Unfortunately I can’t find any way to hide it. The good news is that your FB friends won’t see that in any way when they look at your profile (unless you “like” your own page), but I realize it could still be a problem if someone is sitting next to you while you’re logged in. Facebook really hasn’t done a good job of working with people who want to separate business (or blog) and personal. When I blogged semi-anonymously, I was terrified of accidentally posting something to the wrong account! And it happened quite a few times. Sorry I can’t be more help!
And while there are many ways to boost the speed of your site, these are the top ways: use a good web host, make your site light and mobile friendly, optimize your images, use a caching solution, use a CDN, and take care not to use too many plugins.
Once you have a popular blog, advertisers will be hounding you for the opportunity to advertise. The best way to take advantage of this situation is to use Google Adsense. They find the advertisers for you and all you have to do is place the Google Adsense code on your blog to start running ads. Google Adsense takes all of the hard work out of the process and just cuts you a check.
Over time, this information will help you hone in on your blog’s goals, get specific about your niche, write more posts your readers want to see, develop relationships with sites that link to you, and eventually sell advertising.
One of my favorite ways to get readers to my blog is to post links on my social media accounts like Facebook and Twitter. This is great, because not only do your friends see the link, but if your friends share the link with their friends it automatically multiplies your readers. If you have created high-quality content on your blog then social media is a great way for your blog to go viral.
Readers don’t love being hit with ads over and over again, so start by including just one or two in your sidebar. Be sure to monitor the ads that show up on your blog — you don’t want scammy “make $35,000 in 20 minutes from home!” ads to distract readers from your great content.
The funny thing is that all these things can happen. You could make a full-time income from building a blog. We do it, Corbett Barr does it, and so do many others. And you could become Internet famous like Leo Babauta or Chris Brogan. But if these are the sole reasons why you start blogging, you’ll be miserable, because it will seem like a job, and if it feels like a job you won’t be passionate about it, and so you’ll either (a) hate it, (b) fall flat on your face, or (c) hate it and fall flat on your face.
Thank you for your quick response. I have now turned on followers. But I am still wondering if I am confused as I cannot see a Follow Me button on my Facebook blog. I thought that it would display a Follow Me button on the Facebook blog and give viewers who had found the page the option to follow that page whereby it would show up on their home page when I added a new post to the Facebook blog. Am I mistaken in this assumption? Am I getting confused? I know that on my personal Facebook that I have updates show up on my homepage from Companies whose pages I have LIKED in the past. I don’t know exactly how that happens. Does that mean that people who have liked my page get updates from me on their homepage. I hope I am making sense and I am sorry if I am sounding stupid. I find Facebook very confusing.
Once established, your travel blog itself may earn $3,000 – $5,000 / month, but if you’ve broadened your horizons and started working on other income streams like freelance writing, content creation, social media management and consulting services, you can double or triple this figure.
However, you’re not going to get far competing with those heavyweights, so you need to drill down into your target audience and focus on a subset of those people. By narrowing your focus to a niche (sometimes called an angle), your blog now has room to compete for eyeballs.

Very interesting article. I feel like the most important thing is to love what you’re blogging about. If you’re not passionate about what you’re writing about, nobody will be passionate about your posts. Also, you’ll be at it for a while so you’d better enjoy it because success doesn’t happen overnight.
While you’re more than welcome to write about your every whim and opinion, blogs that focus on a particular niche often perform better in terms of traffic and money-making potential. So think about your passions, your business, your experience or your goals.
I would like an response anyone, preferably from the author. I used to write a Blog and would like to start again. My previous Blog was hosted by WordPress. I was paying about 29.00 dollars a year for many years, but all of a sudden it jumped to about 150.00 a year. I tried contacting WordPress about this unexplained huge increase, but they chose not to respond. Since you recommend using WordPress, how can you assure me they will honour their promises, and when they don’t, what can I do?
Blogs are exploding in popularity. With blogging now mainstream, services are starting to streamline the process to make it easier and funnier for aspiring bloggers. Tumblr is such a service, and aims to not only simplify the experience, but to make the end result appear as beautiful as any other blog.
We can’t stress enough how important your page load speed is. Many site visitors will leave immediately if your page takes longer than 3 seconds to load. Talk about impatient, right? With so much information available online, people aren’t going to wait for it from a website that takes too long to load.
It’s also vital to remember that YouTube is a search engine just like Google and we shouldn’t ignore it. If you create some simple video content to supplement your blog posts you will find that you attract a lot more views and, generally speaking, the stuff you make will appeal to a wider audience.
With dropshipping, you create the store, manage the website, and customer service. But a dropshipping service will take your orders and ship them out to your customers. They’re an invisible third party that your customers don’t even know about.