Thanks for this post. Its really helpful and makes me wanna start blogging. In fact, I will be starting it soon(though its a bit late since 2018 is near lol). But thanks for you post. Its superly encourage me to start soon.
You might want to install a contact form (WordPress.org has plugins for this) or just write out your email address on your contact page. If you’re worried about spam, you can write something like “janice AT janicerunsfast DOT com.”
You hear a lot about the importance of email lists, but in all honesty, they’re only as good as the content you’re directing them to. I would say concentrate on the content. Good email lists are a by-product of great content.
As a keen photographer and travel enthusiast I’ve decided to finally start my own blog, which my friends have been encouraging me to do for a long time. But not knowing anything about how to go about it, I’ve found this piece so valuable. Again, thank you so very much 🙂
I am a writer (freelance) of print production, which as we all know, is going the way of the dinosaurs. While your tutorial was helpful, I am a dinosaur. Please send me one link (I will pay a fee, if reasonable, but I only want to pay one fee…and this tutorial leads me (I am sure, incorrectly), to believe I must pay this and that for a domain , host, ipage, etc.
Granted, you won’t make that kind of money when your blog is small, but when you’re just starting to learn how to make money blogging, affiliate marketing is still a good way to start for several reasons:
WP Engine provides added power for growing blogs or business websites. But this power may be overkill for the new blogger. If you’re just starting out, grab a cheaper plan from Bluehost instead. You can always migrate your website to WP Engine for free if you outgrow Bluehost.
I’m trying to get going for the minimum cost in the first instance. So, my question; is it possible to have more than one blog (or niche) attached to a single website? I have been advised it will cost around £250 for a basic WordPress site (once you have domain, hosting, theme etc). I have done a lot of work with small businesses as an advisor and specialise in marketing. I’m considering offering online courses and e guides. however, I would also like to blog about my hobbies of walking and motor homing. It’s just where to start!
Just a note to mention that my business broke up with Facebook and no longer has a fan page. However, this tutorial still works and you’re welcome to set up a Facebook page for your website or blog if you want!
Jon Morrow is the gold standard in this arena, and this post encapsulates that. He consulted with me at the launch of my blog, and these 20 principles feel like evolutions of that great advice. My numbers are nowhere near his (frankly, my subscriber list seems fixed lately), but my experience validates the core of what’s here: it’s all about consulting, leading to products (in my case, a bit of the other way around, via a book that arose from my website/blog). If you can afford Jon (I can’t), go for it… provided you truly are an “expert” in a given field, one that other people will pay to listen to. If you can’t, or aren’t (at least yet), just read everything he’s written, here and elsewhere.
As with freelancing, there is no startup investment. You can start offering consulting services on your existing blog. All you need is to create a page with a form so users can request more information.
Great question! I suggest you to install WordPress via iPage because if you decide to go self-hosted directly from WordPress.com – it will cost a lot more. That’s the main reason I’m suggest people iPage (to save some money).
PRO TIP: If you choose a new domain extension, be sure to make sure your domain still passes the radio test! Most people online have still not heard of the new extensions, which is why we think they’re best treated with caution.
My response: you’re 98% right. Unless you’re selling exclusively to multimillionaires, the vast majority of your customer base won’t be able to afford premium products, but what’s interesting is it doesn’t matter. Often, you can make more money selling to the 2% than you can to the entire 98% combined.
Tumblr is a little different than other blogging platforms. It is a microblogging platform with social networking features including following other blogs, reblogging, built-in sharing tools, and more.
Also, when you post something on the fan page, it will show up as your blog name, not your real name. However, if you are going to visit another page or profile and you want to comment from your blog name instead of your personal profile, you’ll need to go to the top of the screen, click the little gear icon on the blue Facebook bar, and select “Use Facebook as [blog name].” To switch back, go back to the blue bar, click the down arrow on the far right, and choose “Use Facebook as [your name].”
Having a large number of visitors to your blog means that advertisers will pay to have their ads shown to your readers. The easiest way to blog for money is to get paid for showing advertisements on your blog by joining Google’s AdSense program at http://www.google.com/adsense
Is there a hosting service where you can actually pay BY THE MONTH? I get that you have a money back guarantee, but that’s still a lot of money for me to shell out for something that I’m just starting out. If you are looking to blog to hopefully help generate income, then it seems natural to me for a host to let someone start out slowly.
Jon, amazing article! I would just add to your #15 regarding e-mail subscribers. The number you described is real if you have a legit database of subscribers behind it (don’t know if you take this here for granted).
As always, a fantastic post Jon. Have just shared on G+ with the comment that you are simply the best at what you do. I love your style, and the practical advice is invaluable. I was particularly interested in your downplay of using twitter, FB etc to hope to grow your blog, but what you said makes total sense. As someone who is building an author’s platform prior to publication, I’d been hesitant to sell products, but no more. Thanks so much for your inspiration.

I just realized last week that I created a blog through WordPress. Then I saw this, and I was like “I made the right decision” ☺ I’ve been seeing people using blogspot. But I think WordPress is more sophisticated. Thank you! Very helpful.
Hi Andrea great information very helpful best that I can find. I was wondering if you can help me I am trying to use a plugin for facebook and my wordpress.org to feed my posts from my blog to my facebook page and they keep telling me I need to be a developer. So I signed up to be a developer and it’s so confusing is there any way around this developer thing. I still can’t figure it out I just want my blogs to feed into my facebook page.
It can guide future product creation. If one affiliate product sells 10X better than all the others you promote, you might want to think about developing your own version of the product, because you have proof your audience wants it.
I am just confused about one thing I have been trying to link my blog post which is with wordpresss. Org with my facebook page and it keeps telling me I need to be a developer and then I need to set up an app. I am really confused. I hope you can help.
When it comes to pitching other bloggers, do your homework. Be familiar with the blog’s content — don’t pitch something she’s already written about a hundred times, an idea that’s hopelessly generic or a topic that’s totally outside her niche.
Indirect Income – later on in my blogging journey opportunity has come for ‘indirect’ income streams. As my blogs and profile grew as a result of my blogging I was able to sell my services as a speaker and consultant and was offered the opportunity to author a book with the publisher Wiley. Later I was able to start an event for bloggers which also made money. None of this income came directly from the blog – but rather it came ‘because’ of my blog.
As usual a top knotch post full of excellent advice, very easy to understand and follow. Just studying your posts is an object lesson in how these things are done. I, like many aspiring bloggers, am very familiar with the glazed look that passes over people’s faces when I attempt to explain what my plans are! I think the primary problem is that we have been brought up to do business in a particular way. You make something therefore you get paid for it. Most business people feel there is something inherently wrong about a system where you provide huge amounts of valuable content free of charge and without obligation. The peception is that the model cannot be susstainable.
However, you have to balance placing the ads prominently with the prospect of possibly annoying your readers. We have all visited blogs where it’s difficult to see the content due to the number and size of the ads. This is a delicate balance to achieve and it’s something you will have to experiment with to get the most out of your blog.
In 2018 we plan to extend Inn8ly, a product we’re developing, into the blogging space. We have deep expertise building custom websites on the WordPress CMS but honestly we aren’t that expert in blogging so we’ve been and will be following what you are sharing with some interest.
I have already got a blog set up and I have just got it how I want it on blogger. However, I would like to take it further and maybe gain a higher following. I would like to get my own domain but I don’t want to loose my posts and content. Suggestions? Thankyou so much X
Vision. The reason our site design looks good is because we have a great host, we have a great theme, and most important, we had a vision of how we wanted our blog to look. Once we had the vision, we worked hard to make that vision a reality. (Note: neither of us had any design experience prior to starting a blog.) It’s hard to create a beautiful blog if you don’t know what you want it to look like.
Jon, you always deliver! I’ve printed this out so I can have it handy to refer to as I build my audience/blog. I especially liked the survey info and the info on reverse the funnel. I really struggle with what to charge, but seeing your numbers helps. Tons of info here to digest. Thanks!
Honestly, I’m not sure it’s possible to invite friends to like the page without them figuring out that the page belongs to you. It wouldn’t say that anywhere, but if I saw a notification that said “Lisa invited you to like this page” I would assume you were involved with the fan page somehow.
I have a simple solution to mitigate the sitting still problem. I place an inflated balance cushion on your chair. It forces your lower back to keep moving. I’ve used one for years. It has made a real difference.
Getting hacked. Poorly coded plugins can also introduce security risks. For example, hackers may figure out a way to manipulate the plugin to send spam from your domain name, or to insert hidden links on your site.
The other major difference is Squarespace isn’t free. It has a number of different packages, but you should expect to spend just under $100 per year for their cheapest plan, which is probably all you need if you’re just getting started.