It seems like you got your blog up and running – congratulations! About the “WebPage not available” – this is a common thing. Just wait a few hours, clear your browser cookies and you should be able to see your blog. If you want to speed up the process, follow this guide: http://support.hostgator.com/articles/hosting-guide/lets-get-started/when-will-my-domain-start-working-propagation
For example over the past couple of years, husband and wife team, Bjork and Lindsay at PinchofYum.com, a food and recipe blog, have built up a huge following and some months they have made nearly $25k.
Blogging can be a great source of income. The only regret we have about starting this travel blog is not doing it earlier. We love the job. We love sharing our travel experiences and knowledge with hundreds of thousands of people around the world.
There is a site named Helping Neighbor where you can register to become a Helper, setup your email alerts for the types of jobs you can complete in the areas you prefer so that you can receive paying project requests. Check them out at https://helpingneighbor.com/how-it-works/
Most free services have only basic features. This might not be a problem at first, but as you grow, you will almost certainly feel the pinch. Expandability and flexibility are key, both of which are limited with free blogging services.
On the positive side, a quick search might show you where your competition is getting its links from and that can mean you can replicate them yourself or come up with your own similar promotional strategies. Clever!
Just be aware that affiliate marketing with the wrong company can damage your brand. For instance, I started my blog w/ Blue Host because of Pat Flynn’s recommendation – which I am sure he was paid for. I am now on day 5 of my site, and e-mail being down, with NO estimate from Blue Host as to when it will be back up. As a consequence, I wouldn’t buy a thing he suggested or endorsed, because of my experience with someone he put his seal of approval on. Blue Host has a HORRIBLE reputation among the community, and I even wonder if anyone would “recommend” them unless they were being paid.
Will it be possible to set up a blog where comments cannot be posted and emails cannot be sent to me? My only interest in blogging at this time is for a limited number of friends and family. I don’t want to deal with comments and such from random visitors.
I may not personally know you (yet lol) but let me give you the 2 thumbs up for your achievement and thanks for showing others that their goals are also achievable ($100k a month is a goal for a lot of us Internet marketers)!
Although we love Bluehost, we wish they provided an uptime guarantee. When a web host guarantees a certain amount of uptime (typically 99.9%), their customers can receive compensation if their website goes down for extended periods.
Reddit – ads appear on the top of the various pages. They are obviously ads so users don’t feel tricked into clicking on them. When people choose to select an ad they usually know it. So there is little chance of upsetting customers this way.
I agree about foregoing ads and instead selling your own products in those ad spaces. This might however not be applicable to bloggers who are still new and running the ropes, and to blogs that are still in their growth phase.
Twitter – has a variety of ad options like Facebook and other social networks. The best one for your blog marketing efforts is the Promoted Tweets option. You can expect about $0.50 to $0.75 estimated cost per engagement, which is Twitter’s way of telling you what your cost per click is.
Always blown away by your posts and funnel, but I can’t help but think that there is an easier way. Basically, take everything you reccomend, then only do what is absolutely nessicary for that tactic to work.
Find a community. Blogging at its heart is interactive. You write a blog post and people comment on it. This is a great way to connect with people who are interested in the same things as you are. Blogging allows you to teach these people based on your experience, and it gives you the opportunity to learn from your readers as well.
I hope this guide has answered any questions you had on how to start a blog, but if any of the steps were unclear to you, you can find a more detailed version of each step by using the menu at the top right of this page (or at the bottom of this page if you’re on a smartphone).
You suggest not posting on your blog until you have a decent amount of subscribers, you also mention how surveys are dangerous for finding what your audience needs – My question is: How do you decide what your audience needs a service for if you’ve yet to build an audience?
In addition, you don’t need to be an expert on your topic in order to have a successful blog. For example, readers of a cooking blog don’t want to read a textbook from a food scientist, they want to hear the experiences of someone who has actually cooked some real meals, mistakes and all.
These tips are awesome. Your guide for 0 to $100k is great and contains lots of great deals. All these points are pretty important for bloggers to start his journey as a professional blogger. And you are right most of the world thinks bloggers are fools? But we are fools for changing the world.
As you create the most useful content that you possibly can it is easy to get very insular with your focus and spend most of your time looking at building your blog. Many bloggers have a ‘build it and they will come mentality’ with their blogging but this is a bit of a trap.
Whether you’re looking to supplement your income with a little extra to pay for a few nice treats or create a blog that will support your lifestyle then you can pretty much make as much money as you like from blogging if you are prepared to put in the hard work.
Thank you for your quick response. I have now turned on followers. But I am still wondering if I am confused as I cannot see a Follow Me button on my Facebook blog. I thought that it would display a Follow Me button on the Facebook blog and give viewers who had found the page the option to follow that page whereby it would show up on their home page when I added a new post to the Facebook blog. Am I mistaken in this assumption? Am I getting confused? I know that on my personal Facebook that I have updates show up on my homepage from Companies whose pages I have LIKED in the past. I don’t know exactly how that happens. Does that mean that people who have liked my page get updates from me on their homepage. I hope I am making sense and I am sorry if I am sounding stupid. I find Facebook very confusing.
Thank you so much for this information. I will reread this several times as I am sure it will be very helpful. I am a new Blogger and hope to create something interesting and fun for my readers – and make some money too.. If you could please add me to your email list, I would really appreciate any future info. Thank you again!
You cannot underestimate the power social media has on the success of your blog. Give your readers a way to share their favorite content with those they know and watch your blog’s traffic boom. In addition, provide links to your social media accounts so loyal readers can follow you and either interact with you on social media, or again, share their favorite stuff with everyone else.
For example, if your site is about golf, your readers are likely to have a healthy income. Because of this, there are a good number of advertisers that want to get their ads in front of your readers, and they are likely to pay a good amount per click to do this.
Eric Binnion is a computer science student at Midwestern State University. When Eric is not online, he is usually volunteering in his community or enjoying time with his family. You can find Eric on Twitter.
I have a blog that uses a wordpress theme, and blue host hosts my domain name. However, I don’t really understand what a platform is and I don’t know what my platform is. I am planning to start a new food blog with a different focus and use wordpress.org (whatever that actually means.) Does wordpress.org help you with setting up and explaining whether or not they are your platform? I am a granny (79 to be exact.) I have a three year old cooking blog that never gets visitors except for family and friends. I would like to do better with my blog, but I don’t even understand the idea of platform. Can you give me some advice as to how to proceed?
This sounds a bit similar to my experience, however with a better ending. I accidentally signed up for their WordPress account only to discover I couldn’t do really anything else with the account. I wanted the full (cPanel) version. I called them up and they very graciously switched me at no charge. And, I can still do WordPress on my account.