This guide to making a money making blog is completely free. I don’t want anything for it – just for you to take action and do it, so many of my friends would love to do it but give up too soon, often when their big breakthrough might only be a few weeks away.
The long article/content is definitely one that I have been trying out – does mean though that the amount of articles posted is much much less, as it takes quite a while to write out 6000 words of decent content.
But if you blog daily and feature a combination of advertisements, affiliate offers and your own products, you might be able to make a full-time living from your blog. Let’s break down how most bloggers — including me — make money online.
Though most of my income is generated by helping others 1) get found online and then 2) engage through video, I do use my blog to attract people to me so they can see the services and products I offer.
Once you’ve really understood the audience, it’s a case of demonstrating the potential value the product (in excess of the cost) will bring to the audience in the form of a solved problem. If it’s clear that your product will deliver more value to the customer than they pay for it, then it’s a no brainer for the customer.
2. You can migrate to a self hosted blog later on but if you don’t have your own custom domain name then you’ll lose the traffic you have built up. A domain name is going to cost you $15 from WordPress.com whilst a domain name + 1 years hosting at iPage is around $27 for the sake of around $12 I think it makes sense to start off totally in control.
When you click that blue button you’ll be taken to our guide to starting a blog. Once you buy your domain name, we’ll hook you up with our $20 Pro Blogging ebook totally free! This book will help you to start earning money from travel blogging and turn your travel blogging hobby into a career.
Jon, it’s so disheartening to read this list. Not for my sake, but for the sake of all the hobby bloggers I know who keep asking me why their blogs aren’t getting the traffic, attention, or sales they were hoping for, and how in the world can I be building my email list before I even start blogging? Am I STUPID or something?!
This is the top part of your Dashboard, where you can decide on what type of post to create. The beauty of this is that Tumblr has pre-made layouts for different types of post, and embedded flash players for audio and video.
Did you do your 301 redirects so that googs knows it’s really the same domain, just with a different name? I also changed domains—twice. yuck. Nobody was reading me back then, but it’s not fun while you’re going through just the same.
This is great information. I’m wondering if you can help me – I created a fan page (category: website/blog) separate from my personal Facebook profile page. Now I want to link the two, but the only instructions I can find are for linking business/work fan pages to personal profiles. How can I link my website/blog fan page to my personal Facebook page?
Thanks for this article. By the way, would it be okay if I start blogging with a free account and decide later on hosting the blog? Will the transition be easy enough to migrate from a free account to a paid one? Hope you could shed light on the query. Thank you.
This is where readers pay a regular recurring amount (usually on a monthly or annual basis) for access to either premium content, a community area, some kind of service, tools, coaching (or some combination of these things).
You see, when you first start a blog you have to do a lot of groundwork that takes time. Research, pillar articles, networking, logo creation, social media accounts set up, etc. It is a very time consuming process.
There are plenty of places to find professional web design help. You can take advantage of gig powerhouses like Fiverr, Upwork, or 99designs. You could also do a local Google search to find design firms close to you.
Just make sure if your aim is to build a huge following, sell online, or monetize your blog in any way, you research the niches that are competitive enough to generate revenue but aren’t so oversaturated it’s nearly impossible to break into the niche and make money.
C. The process works as a filter rather than a funnel. You expose your work to thousands, you hope to add value to those thousands for no cost to yourself but of those thousands there will be a few hundred who need your service and they pay for those things in proportion to the cost to you in terms of time or resources.
Know what you want. When you’re interviewing somebody for your site, always enter the interview knowing what story you want them to tell. Have a Skype chat or email exchange with them, before they’re in front of a camera. Do your due diligence: ask what they’re working on, and what interesting opinions they have, and agree in advance what you’ll ask them. During the interview is NOT when you should be deciding what questions to ask.
Will it be possible to set up a blog where comments cannot be posted and emails cannot be sent to me? My only interest in blogging at this time is for a limited number of friends and family. I don’t want to deal with comments and such from random visitors.
2) And second, you mentioned that you would recommend people do guest blogging, and not even post their first blog entry until they have 10,000 subscribers. You then said you would completely dismiss social media for now (which goes against what someone like Gary Vaynerchuk thinks, but that’s fine–nothing wrong with differing opinions).
Blogs don’t have to be just for sharing ideas. In fact, you can turn your WordPress blog into a fully functioning e-commerce shop, and still maintain your blog, all from the same place. You can sell physical items, services, digital downloads, and even accept donations for a cause all through your blog.
Oftentimes people confuse the terms “blog” and “website” because there is a fine line between the two. After all, blogs appear on websites and websites feature blogs. So what really is the difference?

Hi and thanks for all the info. These are great step by step instructions. I am new to blogging and this is my first attempt. I have my domain name from NameCheap. I just purchased hosting with HostGator. Now, when I go to install WordPress, I am not finding the install you mention in your blog. I already installed one time and followed the free link (which looked completely different from your graphics) but I never saw the bar saying your install is complete and I never got any login credentials. When I checked My Installs, WordPress was listed there. Since I could not find the credentials, I uninstalled it. What am I doing wrong here? I think I need to start over!
Second, it keeps your site on Google’s good side. That’s important too. Why? As of late 2017, Google may alert people when a site is insecure. No site owner wants a visitor to get a big fat warning that their site is insecure!
If you’re a total newb to the blog world yourself, what service could you possibly offer someone else? I’m sure I could be a pro hand holder, but the idea of trying to tell someone else how to be successful when *I* don’t even feel like I’m there seems far fetched.
A great post Jon. I enjoyed reading it and learn a lot. I was particularly impressed by your take the one metric that matters. I was also surprised to find that spending time on social media isn’t a great use of a blogger’s time.
So, I do hope, Bill, that you are in the midst of preparing an inspiring blog full of up-liftment that we can all enjoy. In the meantime, please accept my kind regards and my wishes for your success in the future. Onwards and upwards!