If you were to start a travel blog today and work really hard at it (around 3 – 5 focused hours / day), then there’s no reason that you couldn’t start earning around $500 / month from it after 6 months. For travellers, that’s a pretty good chunk of change!
That’s one hell of a promise. Just to put a dollar value on it, you could probably sell a blog with 10,000 subscribers for at least $100,000 in most markets. So, I was essentially promising them $100,000 of value in exchange for only $10,000.
We recommend using the free Amazon Product in a Post Plugin to easily add Amazon products to your blog posts or pages. Or, you could use the premium WooCommerce Amazon Affiliates plugin to create an Amazon Affiliate store using WooCommerce.
For 95% of users, it makes more sense to use WordPress.org also known as self-hosted WordPress. Why? Because it is free to use, you can install plugins, customize your site design, and most importantly make money from your site without any restrictions (see the difference between WordPress.com vs WordPress.org).
Jon, it’s so disheartening to read this list. Not for my sake, but for the sake of all the hobby bloggers I know who keep asking me why their blogs aren’t getting the traffic, attention, or sales they were hoping for, and how in the world can I be building my email list before I even start blogging? Am I STUPID or something?!
Great post ! Thanks. Personally I see a tendency that is becoming more and more important. Small and medium size bloggers getting to work together on a range of projects. Contests, swap of content, NGO’s and charity actions…
First of all the guide very easy and I started my blog using this guide only. But I have a doubt. I started blog using WordPress with a free account and now I want to upgrade my account so that I can use plugins for optimizing my site to get more traffic and after that monetize my site. So the doubt I have is what is the difference between a HostGator plan and a WordPress plan that I can buy directly on the WordPress website.
The topic ” Make money from home ” is very much interesting and people get very much excited when they get to know about it. But people should understand, this isn’t that much easy as they are thinking.
Facebook, little bit of Pinterest. I have done a couple of guest post (I think 5 or 6 so far). Bookmarked it with Stumbleupon and Filipboard. That’s more or less all, since I don’t want to have too many social accounts that I have to update. I need time to write content. What should I focus on?
When I was at Copyblogger, we ran a little experiment. Normally, we refused to sell any ads on the site, but just as a test, we decided to put three ad spots in the right sidebar. The site looked like this:
One of the misconceptions about starting a blog is that you need to be a great writer to be successful. Nothing could be further from the truth. People read blog sites to get a personal perspective on things, so most bloggers write in a very informal and conversational style.
Is there a hosting service where you can actually pay BY THE MONTH? I get that you have a money back guarantee, but that’s still a lot of money for me to shell out for something that I’m just starting out. If you are looking to blog to hopefully help generate income, then it seems natural to me for a host to let someone start out slowly.
Define Your Ideal Readers. Once you’ve found your niche, you need to know who will be reading your blog. For example, we blog about living intentionally. Thus, our ideal readers are people who are interested in exploring minimalism so they can clear the path toward more meaningful lives. If you want to write about your newborn baby growing up, that’s wonderful: your ideal readers are probably your friends and family. If you want to write about restoring classic cars, that’s cool, too. Tailor your writing to your readers (whether it’s your family or local community or whoever else will read your blog).
There are a few downsides, though: It’s a community-built platform so some plugins can be buggy, you have to be moderately technical to figure out any problems you encounter, and there’s a bit of a learning curve.
There may come a time when you have to back up your WordPress site. Maybe you want to do this on a regular basis just to be safe. If not, you’ll at least want to back it up before making major changes or manually updating your theme. There are a couple of easy ways to do this:
This concludes the step-by-step tutorial on how to start a blog. I hope that you not only read this guide, but also took action on it. Blogging is a long, on-going journey, but only by taking the first step will you ever get to see where this road can take you.
Spot-on post though, I’m just genuinely curious…in your experience, have you found it more difficult for people to break into guest blogging since it’s so pervasive among the IM crowd? Is it more-so a matter of who you know versus what you know?
Hi, I’ve just started a dedicated blog for my main business site. I’ve used WordPress, and while setting it up, this guide was fair to help a lot. It’s a great reference for starting up, and taking things further 🙂
On this screen, you will see optional extras that you can purchase. It’s entirely up to you whether or not you purchase these, but we generally don’t recommend purchasing them right away. You can always add them later on, if you decide that you need them.
Oftentimes people confuse the terms “blog” and “website” because there is a fine line between the two. After all, blogs appear on websites and websites feature blogs. So what really is the difference?
A very informative article , it helped me in clearing my doubts about online money making . Bloggers like you help hundreds of new and budding bloggers like me to understand things and move ahead . Thank you very much .
I am so very glad I found your website and read this post. I am so inexperienced in all this, but I do see that you take a totally different approach to the many others I have read. It is so refreshing. I will go back reread, study and apply.
promoting your expertise to deliver training or consultancy services to businesses can be a highly profitable way to create an online income. In the past I have helped lots of businesses get started blogging by working with them to create editorial calendars and giving their marketing teams tips to promote their posts. Whether you’re an Excel guru, a marketing whiz or a customer services master you can build up your profile on your blog.
For instance, I somewhat lack at points 3 (I still haven’t given the mailing list the attention is deserves), 7 (I’m bad at networking and telling people “Hey! I’ve linked to you,” usually), 11 (praying for my health *sobs*), 13 (this is something I’ve myself figured out in the long term. I need to stand out).
At the very top of this blog post on the things you need to know to start a blog I mentioned that I still think a self-hosted WordPress blog is the best bet for serious, professional bloggers. Well, that doesn’t mean that we should totally ignore the other platforms.
Domain and Hosting. The first thing we did when starting our blog was go to Bluehost and register our domain. We didn’t even need to set up a WordPress page first, which is the platform we use, since Bluehost does all that for you. Bluehost’s basic price is $2.95 a month, which works for 99% of people (go to this link to receive a 50% discount off the monthly price and a free domain). Then, we did a simple, free, “one-click” install of WordPress through Bluehost. When we had questions we were able to chat with the “live chat” folks at Bluehost for free. They pointed us in the right direction and made starting our own blog super easy.
If you have previously registered a domain and want to use it for this new site, enter it on the right. (Don’t worry, it won’t mess things up to enter it here. It only identifies your Bluehost account for now.) If you don’t already have one, enter your desired domain on the left.
Affiliate marketing is a little bit different, but easier to explain. Basically, you can sign up to be an “affiliate” with different companies — meaning that when you share about that company on your website, and someone goes to that company’s site and buys things, you will earn a commission. There are thousands of affiliate programs out there. Seriously, tons. If you’re curious, sites will usually have a link at the very bottom of their webpage that says “affiliates,” which explains how to sign up for their program. However, there are “affiliate networks,” like Share-A-Sale, where you can easily browse through and search for your favorite brands and apply for their programs. Usually, you’d sign up to be an affiliate if you like the brand already. It’s kind of like, if you’re going to talk about a product on your blog, you might as well earn a commission for marketing that company’s product to your audience. I find affiliate marketing to be easier if your blog has a clear niche or focus. I imagine fashion bloggers could earn decent commissions because they have the chance to link their clothing using affiliate links. My blog? Not as much. But I still use them from time to time if there’s a product I want to share. Bottom line, if you like something, why not become an affiliate? Here are a few popular affiliate networks:
We receive plenty of emails asking for advice about starting a blog, about how to blog, about blog topics, and about creating meaningful content—even a few questions about whether we wear boxers or briefs. These are the answers and recommendations we tend to give.
As always great post, essential guide to consider for starting a new blog! I started my blogging journey on blogger, but self-hosted WordPress is best to start with! WordPress is better than blogger. . .

TheBlogStarter.com does not share personal information with third parties nor do we store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies. You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your browser settings.
Ever since I chatted to Chris Ducker on Skype last year I’ve been more and more looking to outsourcing as a way to get things done. There are a few reasons as to why this will be even more important in 2018.
I have found there are some people who are actually afraid of starting a blog on WordPress. It is a lot easier than most people believe. I was one of those who was afraid to take the plunge and start a blog using WordPress.
For instance, we have a guest blogging course that retails for $497. In exchange, we promise to help students get featured on a big blog or magazine like The Huffington Post or Forbes. I think it’s fair to say that exposure is worth $5,000 to the right person. So, the product sells easily and well.
Nevertheless, are these instructions still relevant today in that I need to set up a personal ‘profile’ and then create a ‘fan’ page? As I understand it also, to keep them ‘separate’, I should avoid ‘liking’ from one to the other.
Creating a Facebook fan page for your blog can be anxiety-inducing, especially if you’re trying to keep your  real identity separate from your blogging identity. However, it doesn’t have to be complicated – once you see how easy it is, you’ll wonder why you waited so long.
Awesome post so far, Jon. I’ll have to read the full post in the morning since it’s nigh time at where I live. I just have one question. Is it profitable for a freestyle blogger to affiliate marketing? If I’m correct, affiliate marketing is more suitable for niche-based sites, right? Are freestyle blogs even profitable? I’m just starting out, so can you recommend me something?
Our blog actually covers travel tips and insights into expat life along the Oaxacan coast of Mexico, so I am not sure that those sites would be the target audience for our blog’s content even if they were more accessible, which clearly they aren’t.
Well, not exactly. The two have nothing to do with each other. You can start a blog, and you can also start a Facebook fan page for your blog, but they are separate things. Neither one is a guarantee that you’ll earn money.
A great post, Ramsay, and great timing for me. I just went live with a coming soon page for my first website and blog that I plan to launch early next year. It’s great to read what your thoughts are on the future of blogging. I have to admit, I’ve been guilty of what you talk about in #19. I had planned to have my coming soon page up in October, but I was focusing on too many little things and got hung up. Now my challenge will be to not have the same thing happen with the main site.
Jon, you always deliver! I’ve printed this out so I can have it handy to refer to as I build my audience/blog. I especially liked the survey info and the info on reverse the funnel. I really struggle with what to charge, but seeing your numbers helps. Tons of info here to digest. Thanks!
There is a lot to be said about the correlation between a bigger email list and a blog’s success. Even if you aren’t selling anything on your website, capturing your readers’ email addresses and sending out regular newsletters helps keep them in the know about what is happening on your blog. This builds trust and loyalty and brings readers back for more time and again.
This year will be a great blogging year for me because I have a team of 4 working with me and we finally made a system to have consistent blog posts of great quality. Our goal was to acquire 10,000 visits to our website by May 30th, but I decided to up that to 100,000 visits instead!
Once established, your travel blog itself may earn $3,000 – $5,000 / month, but if you’ve broadened your horizons and started working on other income streams like freelance writing, content creation, social media management and consulting services, you can double or triple this figure.
If you are planning to create a personal blog where you discuss a variety of topics then I recommend using your name, or some variation of it, since your blog is all about you. For example, I own the blog scottchow.com. You can also add your middle name or middle initial if you find your name is already taken. Or you could use a variation like “Scott Chow Blog” or “Blogging with Scott”.
Very interesting article. I feel like the most important thing is to love what you’re blogging about. If you’re not passionate about what you’re writing about, nobody will be passionate about your posts. Also, you’ll be at it for a while so you’d better enjoy it because success doesn’t happen overnight.
It seems we are at the same juncture for professional blogging. It strikes me as a positioning opportunity for professional blogging. You have generously done as much or more than anyone I know to move the profession forward. I want to be part of that process. Perhaps, destiny calls.