There is a lot to be said about the correlation between a bigger email list and a blog’s success. Even if you aren’t selling anything on your website, capturing your readers’ email addresses and sending out regular newsletters helps keep them in the know about what is happening on your blog. This builds trust and loyalty and brings readers back for more time and again.
I’m not sure I’m understanding your question. You can create a Facebook fan page from your personal FB account without linking it to your blog page in any way. I was anonymous when I did my first Facebook fan page, so that was a big concern for me.
Know what you want. When you’re interviewing somebody for your site, always enter the interview knowing what story you want them to tell. Have a Skype chat or email exchange with them, before they’re in front of a camera. Do your due diligence: ask what they’re working on, and what interesting opinions they have, and agree in advance what you’ll ask them. During the interview is NOT when you should be deciding what questions to ask.
The step-by-step guide on this site should give you everything you need to get started, but if you run into some issues, or just want some personalized advice, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time. Blogging is my passion, and I would love to talk with you about it!
Ever since I chatted to Chris Ducker on Skype last year I’ve been more and more looking to outsourcing as a way to get things done. There are a few reasons as to why this will be even more important in 2018.
In the above graph, “value” refers to how much the customer values what you’re promising them, not your own personal value. For instance, I personally think my guacamole is worth $10,000 a bowl, but none of my friends agree with me, so I’m forced to give it to them for free. Bastards.
Sidebar ads are just that — ads you see on the side of a site. Though, they can also appear elsewhere, like at the top or bottom of a page. Basically, you earn money when someone buys a little piece of web space on your blog. I have a some on the right side of my page — see ’em? Sponsorships, as they’re often called, can also include other things — like a tweet about your sponsor’s site to your Twitter followers, for example. I use Passionfruit Ads to handle my sponsorships and have never used anything else. There’s a small, yearly fee to use their service, but I personally think it’s well worth it. I’ve been running sponsors on my blog for almost a year now and have really enjoyed the experience, as it’s not only made me an increasing amount of income, but also connects me to tons of other bloggers each month.
Video blogging (aka vlogging) is pretty much like Internet TV.  Bloggers can film themselves on video, upload the clip to a host site like YouTube, and then embed a link (or HTML code) on their blog to share with the world.
Thanks for an awesome step by step. I started by getting a domain and hosting, as per your instruction, but at the end of my registration page on Host Gator, I didn’t find the “Constant Contact” add on. Instead, I have “Get a Pro Email Address from Google” add on. How do I get this Constant Contact add on, and do you suggest me adding the Pro Email Address one? Thank you so much, and so sorry for such a noob question 😀
Although I already started my own blog, I found some useful tips in there. Furthermore, I checked some of the resources you mention in section #5, they’re great and useful (didn’t read them all….. yet 😉
Now, a caveat: don’t turn your blog into a gigantic sales pitch. Nobody likes that. You should, however, be offering something your audience wants and needs. Don’t push them on it, but do make it available, and do remind them from time to time that they can purchase it.
Jaime, great article that you have posted on how to make money with blogging. Lots of informative concepts which a lot of other blogs would have over complicated but you have made it so simple that I find it so easy to read and take notes. I like it how you have broken it down to steps to follow which is great for the first time blogger just getting started in what appears to be an Internet jungle.
Nevertheless, are these instructions still relevant today in that I need to set up a personal ‘profile’ and then create a ‘fan’ page? As I understand it also, to keep them ‘separate’, I should avoid ‘liking’ from one to the other.

When you’re finished, “Install WordPress”. Once you’ve done that, you’ll see a loading bar at the top of your page that will eventually tell you that your WordPress blog has been installed and you’ll see your log-in credentials.
Thanks for this article. By the way, would it be okay if I start blogging with a free account and decide later on hosting the blog? Will the transition be easy enough to migrate from a free account to a paid one? Hope you could shed light on the query. Thank you.
The good news is, adding these buttons is pretty easy. WordPress offers a wide range of plugins to make it simple. A few of my favorites are Monarch ($89), Shareaholic (free) and Simple Share Buttons (free).
Is a fan page the same as a facebook page? And so I just follow the steps you stated in your article and create my page. I did my page with my facebook profile and got nervous so I created a knew facebook acct I will use for my blog
There’s loads of up-sell opportunities from offering training courses and it can easily be scaled if it is mainly self-teaching materials. Not only this, but you can start gathering email addresses from your trainees and start marketing new courses to them.
Email marketing is too big a topic to cover well here, so I created a separate guide to email marketing for those who are interested (hint: every blogger who wants more readers needs to read this guide).
You will also need to decide whether you want to offer personalized support for your course. Some sites offer two tiers of each course: a basic version without support, and a premium version with email support.
Trust continues to be a major issue on the World Wide Web between bloggers and readers. Readers want to see bloggers posting lots and lots of meaningful content to their sites on a daily basis and giving them something to think about. It’s relatively easy for a person to post once a week and expect readers to be converted into repeat buyers when that’s certainly not the case toward being a successful and profitable blogger. Creating quality content and putting people first puts a full-time or part-time blogger in the front seat to earning honest and passive incomes from affiliate marketing.
The main thing is to start, that is the hardest step – don’t be nervous – practise makes perfect your first posts probably won’t be your greatest but only by regularly writing and promoting your blog will you grow your audience and become a better blogger.
Big websites, magazines, and newspapers can target huge audiences because they have massive amounts of content and a stable full of writers to create it. Huffington Post, Sports Illustrated, and the Wall Street Journal fall into this category.
This goes against the grain of 90% of what I’ve learned from the”experts” in the last 9 months of blogging. But man it feels right. I’m so worried about short term gains that I’m not building a long term foundation. I’m thinking so small! These lessons are profound, Jon. Thanks!
Solid numbers about blogging incomes are hard to come by. For example, in the US, the Bureau of Labor Statistics lump bloggers in the very broad category of “Writers and Authors” which has a median income of $61,240 per year. It’s not an accurate measure since there are vastly different occupations included in that category. Information from small surveys and anecdotal evidence can also be found online, but much of it is outdated or taken from tiny sample sizes.
I am going to New Zealand and Australia for two months in a couple of weeks and want to make a travel blog for friends and family in uk and other places. It will have photos, videos (a lot!) and text. It won’t be commercial, I’m not selling anything and will only do it whilst I am away and maybe for a little while when I return.
How much time do you have to blog? You may want to start off with 2 – 3 articles per week. You just don’t want to do too much and become overwhelmed by the amount you are doing. As for length of post, 500+ words since you don’t want your blog to appear to be spammy. In fact you want to create value.
If people immediately think you’re full of shit upon hearing your promise, then you’re in trouble. In my opinion, this is what marketing is really about: getting people to trust you when you say you can help them. The better you are at it, the more money you’ll make.
Similar to the way you connect with fellow bloggers on your blog, connect with fellow vloggers.  You can do this by commenting on vlogs that address similar topics to yours, subscribing to YouTube channels, and inviting vloggers to watch your content.
Honestly, I’m not sure it’s possible to invite friends to like the page without them figuring out that the page belongs to you. It wouldn’t say that anywhere, but if I saw a notification that said “Lisa invited you to like this page” I would assume you were involved with the fan page somehow.
Domain and Hosting. The first thing we did when starting our blog was go to Bluehost and register our domain. We didn’t even need to set up a WordPress page first, which is the platform we use, since Bluehost does all that for you. Bluehost’s basic price is $2.95 a month, which works for 99% of people (go to this link to receive a 50% discount off the monthly price and a free domain). Then, we did a simple, free, “one-click” install of WordPress through Bluehost. When we had questions we were able to chat with the “live chat” folks at Bluehost for free. They pointed us in the right direction and made starting our own blog super easy.