Hi thanks for all your help! So I have a question. I want to make a blog but I want it be self hosted. Do I make it on WordPress first then get into iPage or do I sign up with iPage and then connect it to WordPress? I was a little confused when you was talking about that. Thanks
First of all, let me tell you that it’s okay to be logged into your personal Facebook account when you create your fan page. When I made my first one, I was terrified that my last name, personal profile, or other information would be linked to it. After setting it up and testing it from my son’s profile, though, I learned that I was worried for nothing. If you set it up with a different email address, it will be much more difficult to manage because of all the logging in and out.
For example, you can Love their posts and Reblog it. Loving a post will result in a link to the post that you can visit when you’re on your dashboard. Reblogging their post will publish their post on your Tumblr blog. Following a Tumblr user will bring their posts to your Dashboard, where you can catch up what’s on their mind.
All money making methods you shared in this tutorial is good. A lot of people all over the world are making money following these above methods. These methods are really helpful for teenagers, kids, moms and students. Thank you for share this well researched tutorial with us.
It was interesting to see the diagram wheel picture in tip one with all the different domains that are used. Self-hosted WordPress seems to be the most popular. Do you think it has to do with how you can customize it the way you want the most compared to the other domains? I’m wanting to start my blog of dancing. I sincerely appreciate all of these additional ideas to get my blog started!
Another important thing to point out, which should be a bullet point for each of these, is social network integration. Blogger, for instance, is what I have been using for years and am now looking to move away from it because it has never done a good job of integrating with various social networks. Like, when sharing to Twitter it doesn’t even use a Twitter “card” so the only thing you see is an anonymous URL. Not very helpful when getting the word out about your latest blog post. Thanks for the great comparison, though. This has given me some good ideas on what to move to.
Write Compelling Content. Last, via WordPress, we started writing and uploading the content for our pages: About Page, Contact Page, Start Here Page, Books Page, Tour Page, Archives Page, etc. Next, we designed our logo using free images we found online and text from a regular word-processing program. Then we put a picture of ourselves in the header (this is important because people identify with people, not logos). Finally we started writing new blog posts and publishing them regularly (at least once a week), accompanied by free photos from Unsplash, Pexels, and the Library of Congress. And the rest is history.
While you could just write amazing posts with no visuals or structure, your blog will look a lot nicer with a little formatting and some graphics and pictures — and that helps readers stick around longer.
I found your tips really helpful but I have one question I live in the UK I would love to start blogging but is it possible to open blog in the UK and able to convert the language and menus in to polish ? Or do I have to open it the polish language? 😄
Yeah I totally agree with you. Sometimes it’s just good to check whether a few keywords are going to make a big difference though, I think. For example, this post could have been “start blogging” instead of “start a blog”.
Great Post Jon! I laughed out loud at Lesson#17. I launched a product from my blog that resulted in 0 sales. I will definitely use the tips that you mentioned here going forward in my blogging and business efforts.
Also, when you post something on the fan page, it will show up as your blog name, not your real name. However, if you are going to visit another page or profile and you want to comment from your blog name instead of your personal profile, you’ll need to go to the top of the screen, click the little gear icon on the blue Facebook bar, and select “Use Facebook as [blog name].” To switch back, go back to the blue bar, click the down arrow on the far right, and choose “Use Facebook as [your name].”
One of two behind The SITS Girls and Bloggy Boot Camp. Believer that this community is a movement, and not just a website. Currently on a quest for unending free WiFi & stronger caffeine. I’d love to get to know you better: Find me on Twitter @FranBanducci and on Google+.
You cannot underestimate the power social media has on the success of your blog. Give your readers a way to share their favorite content with those they know and watch your blog’s traffic boom. In addition, provide links to your social media accounts so loyal readers can follow you and either interact with you on social media, or again, share their favorite stuff with everyone else.
Affiliate marketing is one of my favorite and most profitable income streams. You can highlight products or services you use and love without having to do the work of creating or maintaining that product yourself. I talk about affiliate marketing in much more depth in What is Affiliate Marketing? and My Top Affiliate Marketing Tips.
In WordPress, blog layouts are known as “Themes”. What is a blog theme? Themes control the entire design of your blog. To change your theme you are going to click on the “Appearance” tab on the left menu.
This hosting provider’s business plans are great for companies running multiple blogs because they allow for more than one WordPress install. Although most of their plans use shared servers, they provide 99.95% uptime for websites hosted with them.
Creating a Facebook fan page for your blog can be anxiety-inducing, especially if you’re trying to keep your  real identity separate from your blogging identity. However, it doesn’t have to be complicated – once you see how easy it is, you’ll wonder why you waited so long.

We recommend starting your own blog site instead of using a blogging platform like Medium. Medium is an online platform for publishing content. There are many benefits to using the platform, including an instant start to blogging.
Note: This option is only available once your domain registration is fully completed and you are no longer on your temporary domain (see Step 5 above). You’ll know this is the case when you type your chosen domain into any browser (Chrome, Safari, Firefox, etc.) and your domain works, without forwarding to a weird looking domain in the address bar. If your site is still using a temporary domain, put a reminder on your calendar to come back in 2-24 hours to finish this step.
Thanks Jamie, I had the same concerns which is why I wanted to double check with someone with more expertise. One particular offer does indeed link back to a site in the same category/content as my own blog, however it all looks very stagnant and directionless (if that makes sense).
At its heart, blogging is about sharing your knowledge with the world. Choosing a topic that you are passionate about makes the process of starting a successful blog so much easier. Writing about more than one topic is totally fine too. As long as you are writing about things that you are genuinely interested in, your passion will shine through and keep your readers interested.
I am very new to all of this and was wondering if you could explain to me how the money is earned? Say for instance I set up a blog and start blogging how do you earn from it and “who” is cutting the checks, and how often are you paid?
Another option for creating a paid membership site is to create private forums that users must pay to get access to. Forums are a great way for your audience to get one-on-one advice from you. Other members of the community can also interact and help each other out.
Above we mentioned the difference between CPC and CPM ads, where you are paid per click or per thousand views. While you could use one of those models for selling banner ads, most bloggers charge a flat rate instead. Charging a flat rate is easier than keeping track of views or clicks.
Okay, here’s what happens now. When someone “likes” your Facebook fan page, they will see whatever you post to the fan page in their newsfeeds. So, for example, you can set up a service that will automatically update the fan page every time you have a new post on your site. Anyone who has liked your Facebook fan page will see that update. Or you can post a status just like you would from your personal account and your followers will see that as well.