My best tip would be to make a list of the other authors you follow that seem to be using this strategy. Figure out what they’re doing, what people like about it, and then try to find a way to do it a bit differently. Getting your own domain and host is a good start, but you need some ideas about how to grow it based on a distinctive strategy.
If for some odd reason you don’t want to use HostGator, you can always choose another hosting provider. I can’t promise they’ll be that good, but the registration and the setup process should be somewhat similar. Some hosting companies do not have one-click install for WordPress. If that’s the case, see this guide for installing WordPress manually (not recommended for beginners, though).
Hi Justin. I think in the financial industry it’s very important to be and to appear professional. You might not need a logo, but I’d suggest getting some good, relaxed professional photos and then using a minimal black and white WordPress theme with not too much fluff.
2. You can migrate to a self hosted blog later on but if you don’t have your own custom domain name then you’ll lose the traffic you have built up. A domain name is going to cost you $15 from WordPress.com whilst a domain name + 1 years hosting at iPage is around $27 for the sake of around $12 I think it makes sense to start off totally in control.
Thanks for the great guide! I really like your posts! The one question that I have, is what does it mean to install WP? Is it actually installing a system on your computer? Or is it just integrating Hostgator in to WP?
It’s taken me this long to reply…but I figure saying THANK YOU late is better than not saying it all. I’m going to look at parenting…though I am far from a perfect parent. (Self-improvement? That’s why I’m HERE.) Anyhow…thank you for the direction. (And I joined SBO. More than I bargained for that’s for sure!) Peace.
Tumblr is a little different than other blogging platforms. It is a microblogging platform with social networking features including following other blogs, reblogging, built-in sharing tools, and more.
Really excellent article. One suggestion or caution with Godaddy though…Godaddy has a product called WordPress Hosting. I signed up for it, and all was fine until I installed a plugin which had a special requirement that needed to be set up by the webhost. (something in the server side settings). I called Godaddy and they advised they can’t make those changes. Only on their individual hosting plans would that have been possible. This is a rare event, but worth keeping in mind. When you go for your own hosting you have more flexibility.
That’s just amazing. I never thought there can be a number of options to earn from blogs. I always thought serving ads is the only way. Thanks a lot for changing my mind set. Keep sharing informative articles.
Blogs don’t have to be just for sharing ideas. In fact, you can turn your WordPress blog into a fully functioning e-commerce shop, and still maintain your blog, all from the same place. You can sell physical items, services, digital downloads, and even accept donations for a cause all through your blog.

Companies want to get their product in front of potential customers. They may be interested in advertising on your blog if your readers are their ideal customers. Here are ways to incorporate advertising into your blog:
WPBeginner is a very big and popular site which focuses on WordPress more than anything, so this article is on the bias. I would also hope that the author actually used each platform to get a fair accessment too. However, I will give my two cents into this WP vs all others….
Have you tried clearing cookies & cache? Your blog is actually up & running already, but your internet provider haven’t updated your settings. See this guide here: http://support.hostgator.com/articles/specialized-help/how-do-i-clear-my-web-browsers-cache
Also, when you post something on the fan page, it will show up as your blog name, not your real name. However, if you are going to visit another page or profile and you want to comment from your blog name instead of your personal profile, you’ll need to go to the top of the screen, click the little gear icon on the blue Facebook bar, and select “Use Facebook as [blog name].” To switch back, go back to the blue bar, click the down arrow on the far right, and choose “Use Facebook as [your name].”
As for the recent changes, I probably need to write a post. Personally, I’m backing away from Facebook and focusing my energy more on Twitter and Google+. For awhile you could get more views of your posts by posting a status, then putting the link in the first comment, but I just read an article that said FB is going to start cutting back on exposure for those as well. Basically, it seems that unless you’re willing to pay for ads, there is no guarantee that your fans will see your posts (even if they want to). I think it’s really disgusting on FB’s part and I’m willing to walk away at this point. I’ll keep auto posting new blog posts there, but otherwise I’ll engage with my audience and clients on networks that let people make their own decisions about what they see and what they don’t. (Whew, got a little ranty there!)
Jon, thanks for this awesome post. My question is, what do you think of blogs who ask for donations or claim to sustain themselves by them? (Also books and products). But what do you think about the donation itself and if you´re pro-donation, when is a good time to start asking for it in a blog? Thanks a lot for your time. Hope some day I can meet you Im from and live in Mexico
If you’re a food blogger, you might want to compile a cookbook of your best recipes. Or if you run a fashion blog and recently purchased an entire wardrobe at your local thrift store for under $100, you could create a video course to help other people do the same.
I mean, of course I’d come up with suitable content for Forbes should they wish to publish me, haha, but honestly we’d be happy with guest posting on even mildly popular travel blogs. The problem up to now, as I mentioned above, is that nobody wants to let us guest post, they want us to pay to do a sponsored post since our blog is attached to our business. If my blog was MexicoMike.com instead of http://blog.geckorockresort.com/ then it wouldn’t be an issue, but as soon as anyone sees the name of our business they incorrectly assume we’re loaded 🙂
Hi, just wanted to comment that I agree with the straight-forward approach. It’s the best way to learn information quickly, without digging through ingratiated, sugar-coated words to get to the point. I can’t yet afford any of the training, so I find many blogs and pieces of information like this every day. I have to read fast and get through it, otherwise I’ll sit there all day reading through feel-good mush.
It allows you to quickly insert links into posts, create branded links, auto-replace keywords into links, and even see how each link is performing on your site. You can see our guide on how to add affiliate links in WordPress with ThirstyAffiliates for more info.
This is such an awesome content from Jon Morrow. It inspires me a lot and I hope other bloggers will be inspired too after reading these valuable and effective lessons on how to build a profitable blog. The lessons given are practical and are delivered wisely.
I have read about being careful to charge enough to cover my expenses, also not to undercut others who must cover expenses, and really, I think that an admirable goal. I don’t want to run someone else’s life, to guarantee their life-long success if I’m the one in control. I just want to publish, successfully, and thereby help as many as possible.
Hi and thanks for all the info. These are great step by step instructions. I am new to blogging and this is my first attempt. I have my domain name from NameCheap. I just purchased hosting with HostGator. Now, when I go to install WordPress, I am not finding the install you mention in your blog. I already installed one time and followed the free link (which looked completely different from your graphics) but I never saw the bar saying your install is complete and I never got any login credentials. When I checked My Installs, WordPress was listed there. Since I could not find the credentials, I uninstalled it. What am I doing wrong here? I think I need to start over!
WordPress is the world’s most popular CMS (content management system). It powers 27%+ of all websites online today, and an even larger percentage of blogs. (You’ll find more insane WordPress statistics over here).
Define Your Ideal Readers. Once you’ve found your niche, you need to know who will be reading your blog. For example, we blog about living intentionally. Thus, our ideal readers are people who are interested in exploring minimalism so they can clear the path toward more meaningful lives. If you want to write about your newborn baby growing up, that’s wonderful: your ideal readers are probably your friends and family. If you want to write about restoring classic cars, that’s cool, too. Tailor your writing to your readers (whether it’s your family or local community or whoever else will read your blog).
I’ve been through quite a lot with my days a blogger. I was making money, but it just wasn’t enough. You literally make pennies and dollars. That is not enough to support yourself. It wasn’t until I met Noah King. A mentor of mine who taught me how to make REAL MONEY online writing about what I love. I am now making $6000/month after a year of hard work and can do it all from the convenience of my home. Never give up or sell yourself short! Noah has his own website where he talks about how to achieve the same success he has. You can check him out here if you’re interested – http://www.deservingwriter.com/
I’m not sure I’m understanding your question. You can create a Facebook fan page from your personal FB account without linking it to your blog page in any way. I was anonymous when I did my first Facebook fan page, so that was a big concern for me.
I’m about to build another theme site/shop and was going to use WP, but based on past experiences, I am going to use Joomla because I know the capabilities and flexibility will make managing a site like this (which will have a blog in it), go much smoother, and then there’s security.
However, you have to balance placing the ads prominently with the prospect of possibly annoying your readers. We have all visited blogs where it’s difficult to see the content due to the number and size of the ads. This is a delicate balance to achieve and it’s something you will have to experiment with to get the most out of your blog.
If you use the method below, $5 to $10 a month. I blogged for years on this budget. As my blog and income grew, I eventually started paying for more premium tools and services, but they are not required to start.
I usually choose something that looks professional and pretty easy to customise. WordPress also has this awesome feature that allows you to change themes with just a few clicks. So if you start getting tired of your current blog template, you can just switch to another one without losing any precious content or images.
WordPress also have a variety of plugins that make it easy to put social sharing buttons on your blog posts. Some people like to limit the number of plugins they use on their WordPress blog because it can slow the blog down and it can open your blog up to more attacks, butt a social sharing plugin is one that should have high priority if you do choose to use plugins.
Need another reason to add photos? Readers love to put a face to the name, or an image to the recipe or colors to the outfit — and when you add something visual, they’re a lot more likely to share your post with their friends or followers, which goes a long way toward helping your blog gain traction.
One of my favorite ways to get readers to my blog is to post links on my social media accounts like Facebook and Twitter. This is great, because not only do your friends see the link, but if your friends share the link with their friends it automatically multiplies your readers. If you have created high-quality content on your blog then social media is a great way for your blog to go viral.
Know what you want. When you’re interviewing somebody for your site, always enter the interview knowing what story you want them to tell. Have a Skype chat or email exchange with them, before they’re in front of a camera. Do your due diligence: ask what they’re working on, and what interesting opinions they have, and agree in advance what you’ll ask them. During the interview is NOT when you should be deciding what questions to ask.
When an up-and-coming band auditions to be an opening act, do you think the more famous band cares where they have played? Not really. All they care about is the strength of the audition. If the up-and-coming band is good, they get the gig. If they suck, it doesn’t matter where they played or how good everyone else says they are, they get a polite no.
If I want to share links to my new blog posts out to my real Facebook friends, I can simply become a fan of my own blog page and then share the articles with my friends as I see them in my feed, correct?